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January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Manny Pacquiao

Esther Lin/Showtime

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THE great Manny Pacquiao cruised to a comfortable unanimous decision over “The Problem” Adrien Broner to defend his WBA welterweight title on Saturday night in front of a sold-out MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. The scores were 117-111, 116-112 twice.

The Filipino icon and boxing’s only eight-division champion Pacquaio – who was fighting for the first time as a 40-year-old, and the first time in the United State in more than two years – used effective jabs and sustained body work in his 70th professional fight that was watched by an announced attendance of 13,025 fans, including the retired Floyd Mayweather.

Manny Pacquiao vs Adrien Broner Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao Manny Pacquiao

In the co-feature, Staten Island native Marcus Browne (23-0, 16 KOs) won defeated a bloodied Badou Jack (22-2-3, 13 KOs) by upset unanimous decision for the Interim WBA Light Heavyweight belt. The scores were 119-108, 117-110, 116-111.

Jack suffered a gruesome five-inch cut to his forehead after an accidental clash of heads in the seventh round of the fight. The former Olympian Browne told Gray the head butt did not affect the outcome of the fight.

“He couldn’t find me before that [head butt],” said the 28-year-old Browne, who made his professional debut on ShoBox: The New Generation following the 2012 Olympics. “He couldn’t find me. I was just too sharp, too slick, too anything. He was coming with his head all night. He kept coming with his head.”

The Las Vegas resident and former two-division champion Jack was taken immediately to the hospital for observation. Jack, who was fighting in his seventh consecutive world title fight, gave all the credit to Browne. “I was flat,” he said. “I don’t know what it was, but no excuses. I would love the rematch. Now I have to rest, get the head fixed and hopefully get that chance in the future.”

Browne was the more active fighter, throwing 515 total punches to 303 for Jack. Browne connected on 103 of his power punches compared to just 58 for Jack.

The taller, southpaw Browne said he stuck to his game-plan and peppered Jack continuously with his strong straight left jab. “He thought he was going to take me to deep water and drown me, but I was in shape,” he said. “Teddy Atlas, you think you have the best light heavyweight? (Oleksandr) Gvozdyk, let’s go.

“I just used my athletic ability and did what I do best, and that’s box the hell out of people.”

In a rematch of their close 2012 Olympic showdown, France’s Nordine Oubaali (15-0, 11 KOs) captured the vacant WBC Bantamweight World Title with a unanimous decision against Cincinnati’s Rau’shee Warren (16-3, 4 KOs). The scores were 117-111, 116-112, 115-113.

“This was my dream,” said Oubaali, who was making his U.S. debut. “I made my dream come true, my American dream. I want to thank all the people of America and France who supported me.”

By winning the all-southpaw matchup, the 32-year-old Oubaali became the first French-born champion in 11 years.

The first six rounds were close as both fighters were separated by four or fewer punches. Oubaali controlled the fight in the middle rounds, with SHOWTIME’s official scorer Steve Farhood giving the more active Oubaali rounds five through 10 before giving Warren the close 11th.

“I felt like I was doing pretty good in the beginning of the fight but after the fifth or sixth I let off the gas,” said Warren, a former world champion. “I was using my jab and wanted to finish it with my left hand. The judges saw it the way it was. He wanted it more. You could tell. He had his foot on the gas.”

The seventh round was the most action-packed of the fight with Oubaali going on the attack and hurting Warren by landing effective combinations. Oubaali pulled away in the final six rounds as he out-landed Warren 100-51 in total punches and was the effective aggressor and the more active fighter.

Following the ninth round, Warren’s trainer Barry Hunter could be heard telling Warren he needed each of the final three rounds if he was going to win the fight.

“I put on the pressure,” Oubaali said. “I had the speed. He is a very good boxer – he’s slick, and he’s smart. This is a very big night to win my first world championship.”

In the telecast opener, Hugo Ruiz (39-4, 32 KOs) was successful in his featherweight debut as he dominated late replacement Alberto Guevara (27-4, 12 KOs), knocking him down once in the opening minute of the fight and winning easily on all three judges’ scorecards 100-89, 99-90 twice.

The fast starting Ruiz, who has 18 previous knockouts in round one, showed his early power and he sent the former two-time world title challenger Guevara to the canvas with a strong right followed by a left uppercut at 1:41 of the first round.

“It was hard for me training for a southpaw and then getting a new opponent I knew nothing about,” said the 30-year-old Ruiz, from Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico, who is a former world champion at 122 pounds. “The other guy was a puncher and this guy is a boxer. It’s tough to fight a guy who is just trying to survive out there and running. He came in and got caught early, and that set the pace for the rest of the fight.”

Mexico’s Guevara was fighting on just one days’ notice after Jhack Tepora failed to make the 126-pound weight limit on Friday.

“It was supposed to be a title fight,” Ruiz said. “I was so disappointed and my mind wasn’t totally in it.”

All photos: Esther Lin/Showtime

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January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Manny Pacquiao

Esther Lin/Showtime

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MANNY PACQUIAO has told Floyd Mayweather he is open to a rematch if the American is prepared to come out of retirement to challenge him.

Pacquiao, 40, retained his WBA ‘regular’ world welterweight title with a unanimous points victory over American Adrien Broner in Las Vegas and while he was non-committal over what may lie ahead, he insisted he is open to the possibility of gaining revenge over 41-year-old Mayweather for his 2015 defeat.

Asked repeatedly about a rematch at his post-fight press conference, he said: “My message is I’m still active and if he goes back to the ring and wants to challenge me, I’m a champion. Get back to the ring and we will fight again if he wants.

Manny Pacquiao has urged Floyd Mayweather (pictured) to come out of retirement
Manny Pacquiao has urged Floyd Mayweather (pictured) to come out of retirement (Steven Paston/PA)

“If he wants to come out of retirement, then announce it and challenge me. I’m a champion and I don’t pick any opponent.

“I’m just waiting to see who will challenge me, who will challenge [for] my belt.”

Five-weight world champion Mayweather was among the crowd at the MGM Grand Garden Arena to see Pacquiao defeat an opponent 11 years his junior 117-111, 116-112, 116-112 after 12 rounds in his 70th fight.

Broner later insisted he had won, but was refusing to be bowed by the result.


He said: “As you can see, I’m wearing these glasses for fashion, I haven’t got a mark on me. It was a hell of a fight. I give props to Manny Pacquiao. I’m not going to come up here and go crazy, I don’t have to. My performance tonight talked for me.

“I came and I gave them what they weren’t looking for. If you ask me, I feel like I won the fight, but I’m not about to sit here with a sad face. I’m all right, I’m all right and I will be back and I will be champion again.”

Asked about Broner’s verdict, Pacquiao said: “We cannot blame him. I’m sure he will review the fight and think about it.

Thank you Lord for the victory! Thank you to my wife Jinkee, my family, friends and fans from all over the world. Thank…

Posted by Manny Pacquiao on Sunday, January 20, 2019

“Adrien Broner is a good boxer. He’s fast, he moves fast – he’s a former champion, so he’s the kind of fighter that you cannot underestimate, you cannot take him lightly.

“He gave me a hard time in this fight.”

However, Broner was adamant that he should have got the nod.

He said: “Hell yeah, I believe I won the fight. When you believe that you want cheese on that burger, you know what you’re looking for. Hell yeah, I feel like I won. I really did believe that I won the fight.”

January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Floyd Mayweather

Action Images/Reuters

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ON THIS DAY in 2001, a 23-year-old Floyd Mayweather, campaigning as a super-featherweight, met tall gunslinger Diego Corrales. What followed was, some experts say, Mayweather’s finest performance.

The anticipated thriller took place at The MGM Grand in Las Vegas, and “Pretty Boy,” as Mayweather Jnr was then known, defended his WBC super-featherweight title against the big-hitting warrior known as “Chico.”  The expected tough night for Floyd did not materialise. Instead, the bout turned out to be a one-sided beat-down in the favour of the unbeaten master from Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Sporting a 24-0 record, Mayweather shone like never before. The tall and ultra-dangerous Corrales was coming off an impressive third-round stoppage of Angel Manfredy, and the undefeated 22-year-old  who was 33-0 had won six of his last seven by KO. The former IBF 126-pound ruler (title never lost in the ring), was widely expected to give the flashy, superbly-skilled Mayweather his toughest test yet. Some fans even went further, comparing the upcoming fight to the 1981 welterweight classic between Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns. Instead, though we saw a classic performance, no great fight was witnessed.

What we saw one man’s utter dominance over another at the highest level of the sport. Five times in all the freakishly brave Corrales hit the man – only to get up and fight back, or try to fight back, on each occasion. Corrales never won a round all night, and in the end, after the fifth knockdown, in the tenth-round, Diego’s corner threw in the towel. As was his warrior nature, Corrales went all-but berserk, chewing out his corner for coming to his rescue.

In actuality, though, Corrales was saved for another day. On this night he was never going to beat Mayweather. Of course, to this day, no man has bested Mayweather, but back when he was making a very good fighter look incredibly ordinary, Mayweather was busy meeting and defeating the best around. Today, some critics say the number-one fighter on the planet is guilty of “cherry picking” his opposition.

That accusation is another article altogether. But when Mayweather was willing to risk his perfect record against dangerous and risky punchers like Corrales, “Money” showed he is more than capable of rising to the occasion.

Since January 20th in 2001, Mayweather has boxed 24 times and he has claimed titles up at lightweight, light-welterweight, welterweight and light-middleweight compiling an overall 49-0 (26) ledger. However, some say he has never looked better than when he was chopping down Chico.

As for Corrales, he went on to engage in some fantastic wars; his 2005 epic with Jose Luis Castillo being a fight that will never be forgotten. Sadly, he left us far too young, when a motorbike accident took his life in 2007. Then aged just 29, Corrales’ final ring record reads 40-5 (33).

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January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Jan 19, 2019; Las Vegas, NV, USA; Manny Pacquiao (black trunks) and Adrien Broner (purple/silver trunks) box during a WBA welterweight world title boxing match at MGM Grand Garden Arena. Mandatory Credit: Joe Camporeale-USA TODAY Sports

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‘MANNY PACQUIAO cruises to unanimous points victory over Adrien Broner to set up rematch with Floyd Mayweather’ is the headline that was already written. We knew, or at least we were fairly certain, that Manny Pacquiao would have too much left for the eternally disillusioned Adrien Broner. And we knew that Floyd Mayweather, aloof yet eager to be involved, would sit at ringside and rumblings of May-Pac II would increase in volume.

So it proved.

On his way to posting a unanimous points win and then answering questions about Mayweather, Pacquiao was busier than Broner, more accurate, craftier and fitter. In short, he was better. Better at the age of 40 than Broner is at the age of 29. Better at the age of 40 than Broner has ever been, or ever will be.

At the end of 12 rounds he mostly lost, after a week of typical Broner behaviour that made it impossible to root for him, he ranted and raved and again blamed all but himself for his shortcomings. Yet the fact he was given yet another chance to show us what we already knew said plenty about the boxing world today.

But none of that was or should be a surprise. We’ve been admiring Pacquiao for many years, even his later years when – predominantly – the Filipino has defied them. Similarly, we’ve been expecting Broner to lose pretty much every time he’s stepped up, and then called him all sorts when he’s done exactly that.

So did we learn anything new last night? Well, not really. The theme merely gathered pace.

So we love to hate Broner, yet the extent of how much we love to love Pacquiao was more apparent. The superlatives flowed in the aftermath of Pacquiao’s latest success and they were deserved to a point. I can’t think of a fighter so effortlessly energetic at the age of 40. He’s a joy to watch, has skills and guile to burn, and he’s at ease with getting older. He’s not trying to convince anyone he’s better than ever while convincing everyone he’s better than most.

His punches don’t carry the weight of his peak, but he still throws an awful lot of them. Furthermore, they’re accurate and hurtful and continue to get the job done.

Well, they do against a certain type of fighter.

Which is why it’s important to retain some objectivity when analysing his work. Because though we should give Pacquiao ample credit for the level of his performance, we must also keep in mind our long-held opinion on Broner as we do so. Let’s not go overboard because Pacquiao defeated a fighter he was supposed to defeat.

For context, think of how critics reacted to Floyd Mayweather’s 49th career win, and many other wins besides, when he outscored the undeserving Andre Berto over 12 rounds in 2015. What followed that victory was accusations of Mayweather handpicking his opponent, of playing by his own rules and making a mockery of more deserving rivals in the process.

In truth, the Andre Berto of 2015 was a better welterweight contender than the ‘AB’ that Pacquiao defeated last night. Yet you can bet Manny’s triumph will be more highly regarded when all is said and done. Let’s face it, Pacquiao will always be a hero and Mayweather will always be a villain.

And it’s for that reason alone why May-Pac II remains appealing to some in 2019. It’s the same reason why Pacquiao beating Broner so effectively provided so much pleasure to so many.

Pacquiao is not claiming to be something he’s not. He’s not getting up people’s noses by shoving dollar bills in their faces or marching through Las Vegas chanting ‘easy work’ while calling himself the best fighter who ever lived.

Throughout his career Pacquiao has retained that everyman appeal through humility and that, alongside his all-action style, continues to go a long way when we assess his accomplishments now. Humble and always willing to let his hands go. Talk about the opposite of Floyd.

And it’s that contrast of characters, more than their fighting styles at this point, that will likely make Mayweather-Pacquiao II appealing to millions.

You might scoff at the thought of a return. But I also bet you’ll watch when it almost inevitably occurs. And while I completely agree with those who say we should forget about this nonsense and focus on younger fighters and better contests, it’s also important to remember how much boxing has moved on since their first encounter in 2015.

Back then May-Pac was supposed to save the sport. So much was riding on it. So much money was spent on it. Boxing needed it to deliver because the whole world was watching. As a consequence of that pressure and expectation, what followed was always going to disappoint.

In 2019, the landscape is different. Boxing will not hold its breath this time. It has more important things to be worrying about, like Anthony Joshua, Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury. Like the rise of Vasyl Lomachenko, Canelo Alvarez and Terence Crawford. Like the next steps for Naoya Inoue and Oleksandr Usyk. And where Gennady Golovkin goes from here.

May-Pac II provides an interesting aside to the above, but it should not be allowed to be more than that.

Otherwise we’ll just be disappointed. Disappointed that it’s not a thriller. Disappointed when Pacquiao, your hero, my hero, everyone’s hero, shows what we have always known, or at least known for a while: That although Manny Pacquiao is much too good for Adrien Broner, he’s not quite good enough to beat Floyd Mayweather.

January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Manny Pacquiao

Joe Camporeale/USA TODAY Sports/Action Images

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All-time great Manny Pacquiao cruised to a comfortable unanimous decision over Adrien “The Problem” Broner to defend his WBA ‘regular’ welterweight world championship on SHOWTIME PPV® Saturday night in front of a sold-out MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. The scores were 117-111, 116-112 twice.

The global icon and boxing’s only eight-division champion Pacquaio – who was fighting for the first time as a 40-year-old, and the first time in the United State in more than two years – used effective jabs and sustained body work in his 70th professional fight that was watched by an announced attendance of 13,025 fans, including the retired Floyd Mayweather.

“I proved in my last fight against [Lucas] Matthysse and now I proved it again: The Manny Pacquiao journey will still continue,” Pacquiao said.

Asked by SHOWTIME’s Jim Gray if he would like to rematch Mayweather in the future, Pacquiao said he’d do it if Mayweather unretired.

“Tell him to come back to the ring and we will fight,” Pacquaio said. “I’m willing to fight Floyd Mayweather again if he’s willing to come back to boxing.”

SHOWTIME Sports official scorer Steve Farhood scored the fight 118-110 in favor of the Filipino Pacquiao (61-7-2, 39 KOs), giving Cincinnati’s Broner (33-3-1, 24 KOs) only the fourth and the 10th rounds.

Broner said he thought he did enough to win the fight. “I beat him,” he said. “Everybody out there knows I beat him. I controlled the fight, he was missing. I hit him clean more times. I beat him.”

Pacquiao maintained a strong pace throughout the fight, throwing 47 punches per round compared to Broner, who averaged almost half that output. Broner was limited to single-digit total connects in every round while Pacquiao exceeded double-digits five times.

“I wanted to push more but my trainer said don’t be careless,” Pacquiao said. “Wait for him, counter, and that’s what I did.”

Manny Pacquiao

In the co-feature, Staten Island native Marcus Browne (23-0, 16 KOs) defeated a bloodied Badou Jack (22-2-3, 13 KOs) by upset unanimous decision for the Interim WBA light-heavyweight belt. The scores were 119-108, 117-110, 116-111.

Jack suffered a gruesome five-inch cut to his forehead after an accidental clash of heads in the seventh round of the fight. The former Olympian Browne told Gray the head butt did not affect the outcome of the fight.

“He couldn’t find me before that [head butt],” said the 28-year-old Browne, who made his professional debut on ShoBox: The New Generation following the 2012 Olympics. “He couldn’t find me. I was just too sharp, too slick, too anything. He was coming with his head all night. He kept coming with his head.”

The Las Vegas resident and former two-division champion Jack was taken immediately to the hospital for observation. Jack, who was fighting in his seventh consecutive world title fight, gave all the credit to Browne. “I was flat,” he said. “I don’t know what it was, but no excuses. I would love the rematch. Now I have to rest, get the head fixed and hopefully get that chance in the future.”

Browne was the more active fighter, throwing 515 total punches to 303 for Jack. Browne connected on 103 of his power punches compared to just 58 for Jack.

The taller, southpaw Browne said he stuck to his game-plan and peppered Jack continuously with his strong straight left jab. “He thought he was going to take me to deep water and drown me, but I was in shape,” he said. “Teddy Atlas, you think you have the best light heavyweight? [Oleksandr] Gvozdyk, let’s go.

“I just used my athletic ability and did what I do best, and that’s box the hell out of people.”

In a rematch of their close 2012 Olympic showdown, France’s Nordine Oubaali (15-0, 11 KOs) captured the vacant WBC bantamweight world title with a unanimous decision against Cincinnati’s Rau’shee Warren (16-3, 4 KOs). The scores were 117-111, 116-112, 115-113.

“This was my dream,” said Oubaali, who was making his U.S. debut. “I made my dream come true, my American dream. I want to thank all the people of America and France who supported me.”

By winning the all-southpaw matchup, the 32-year-old Oubaali became the first French-born champion in 11 years.

The first six rounds were close as both fighters were separated by four or fewer punches. Oubaali controlled the fight in the middle rounds, with SHOWTIME’s official scorer Steve Farhood giving the more active Oubaali rounds five through 10 before giving Warren the close 11th.

“I felt like I was doing pretty good in the beginning of the fight but after the fifth or sixth I let off the gas,” said Warren, a former world champion. “I was using my jab and wanted to finish it with my left hand. The judges saw it the way it was. He wanted it more. You could tell. He had his foot on the gas.”

The seventh round was the most action-packed of the fight with Oubaali going on the attack and hurting Warren by landing effective combinations. Oubaali pulled away in the final six rounds as he out-landed Warren 100-51 in total punches and was the effective aggressor and the more active fighter.

Following the ninth round, Warren’s trainer Barry Hunter could be heard telling Warren he needed each of the final three rounds if he was going to win the fight.

“I put on the pressure,” Oubaali said. “I had the speed. He is a very good boxer – he’s slick, and he’s smart. This is a very big night to win my first world championship.”

In the telecast opener, Hugo Ruiz (39-4, 32 KOs) was successful in his featherweight debut as he dominated late replacement Alberto Guevara (27-4, 12 KOs), knocking him down once in the opening minute of the fight and winning easily on all three judges’ scorecards 100-89, 99-90 twice.

The fast starting Ruiz, who has 18 previous knockouts in round one, showed his early power and he sent the former two-time world title challenger Guevara to the canvas with a strong right followed by a left uppercut at 1-41 of the first round.

“It was hard for me training for a southpaw and then getting a new opponent I knew nothing about,” said the 30-year-old Ruiz, from Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico, who is a former world champion at 122 pounds. “The other guy was a puncher and this guy is a boxer. It’s tough to fight a guy who is just trying to survive out there and running. He came in and got caught early, and that set the pace for the rest of the fight.”

Mexico’s Guevara was fighting on just one days’ notice after Jhack Tepora failed to make the 126-pound weight limit on Friday.

“It was supposed to be a title fight,” Ruiz said. “I was so disappointed and my mind wasn’t totally in it.”

January 20, 2019
January 20, 2019
Manny Pacquiao vs Adrien Broner

Joe Camporeale/USA TODAY Sports/Action Images

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IT’S time for Manny Pacquiao vs Adrien Broner. Does ageing superstar Pacquiao still have a world class performance left in him? Can Adrien Broner be as good as he proclaims himself to be? Tonight at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas we will find out.

Rau’shee Warren will fight Nordine Oubaali for the vacant WBC bantamweight world title. Also on the card Badou Jack boxes Marcus Browne.

Scroll down for the latest updates.

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January 19, 2019
January 19, 2019
boxing results

Ryan Hafey/Premier Boxing Champions

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Fight of the week (Significance): Caleb Plant as is win over Jose Uzcategui will open many doors for him.

Fight of the week (Entertainment) Plant vs. Uzcategui supplied plenty of action

Fighter of the week: Has to be Plant but with honourable mention to Devin Haney

Punch of the week: The right from Meiirim Nursultanov was a real thunderbolt and the right that gave Brandon Figueroa his first knockdown against Moises Flores was special.

Upset of the week: Plant beating Uzcategui was unexpected as was Jaider Parra’s victory over unbeaten Fabian Maidana, Parra vs. Maidana

Prospect watch: Plenty on show this week with Brandon Figueroa, Meiirim Nursultanov and Frank Sanchez all impressing.

 

World Title Shows:

 

January 13

 

Los Angeles, CA, USA: Super Middle: Caleb Plant (18-0) W PTS 12 Jose Uzcategui (28-3). Feather: Brandon Figueroa (18-0) W TKO 3 Moises Flores (25-2,2ND). Light Heavy: Ahmed Elbiali (19-1) W TKO 3 Allan Green (33-6).Super Feather: Guillermo Rigondeaux (18-1) W KO 1 Giovanni Delgado (16-9). Welter: Ryan Karl (16-2) W TKO 5 Kevin Watts (12-3). Super Light: Lindolfo Delgado (8-0) W KO 3 Sergio Lopez (22-13-1).

Plant vs. Uzcategui

The IBF super middleweight title changed hand as the relevantly unknown Plant outboxed and floored champion Jose Uzcategui twice on the way to a unanimous decision. Plant was giving away height and reach but boxed on the outside being quicker to the punch and using good movement to negate Uzcategui’s power and aggression. In the first round Uzcategui kept marching forward but was not throwing enough punches and unable to land anything of consequence or deal with the jab and move tactics of Plant. Early in the second Plant landed a quick left hook to the chin which put Uzcategui down. It was not a heavy knockdown and Uzcategui was up quickly and back on the prowl but Plant was just too quick and slick for him. Plant outboxed Uzcategui in the third but in the fourth was cut over his right eye in a clash of heads. That spurred Uzcategui into attacking fiercely but as he shaped to throw a left hook Plant fractionally beat him to it and dropped Uzcategui for the second time. Again Uzcategui was up quickly and taking the fight to Plant but he was just too slow to hunt Plant down. Plant took the fifth as he constantly pierced Uzcategui’s guard with his jab. Uzcategui finally won a round in the sixth. He let his punchers go more and did a better job of cutting off the ring forcing Plant to stand and trade. That proved to be a false dawn for Uzcategui as Plant outboxed him and outlanded him in the seventh and eighth to extend his lead. Finally the pace he had set began to tell on Plant and in the ninth he was no longer moving but standing in close and trading and Uzcategui had Plant reeling with some of his trade mark left hooks. Uzcategui had Plant hurt again in an exciting tenth rocking him with a terrific right cross. Plant saw the danger signs and went back to his boxing moving and jabbing and he edged the eleventh. With the fight won Plant was just looking to stay out of trouble in the last and Uzcategui never really threatened to find the knockout he needed. All three judges had Plant a clear winner with Max DeLuca and Zachary Young both scoring it 116-110 and Lou Moret 115-111. It was a very emotional victory for Plant. When his 19 months old daughter Alia died two years ago Plant promised he would win a world title and he fulfilled that promise here. Plant 18-0 (10) was a huge underdog but with the IBF title is now a major player in the super middleweight mix. In the amateurs Plant, 26, won a gold medal at the 2011 National Golden Gloves but failed to progress throught the US Olympic Trials for the 2012 Games. He made one appearance for the USA Knockouts, a winning one, in the World Series of Boxing.  Mexican-based Venezuelan Uzcategui, 28, was a huge disappointment. He had impressed in 2018 with wins over Andre Dirrell and Ezequiel Maderna looking strong and dangerous. In this fight he was exposed as being one-paced and that pace was slow.

Figueroa vs. Flores

Young Figueroa may be a new name on the block but he showed in this fight that he is definitely a fighter for the future as he overwhelmed and destroyed the former interim WBA and IBO champion Flores. “The Heartbreaker” from Texas holds the CompuBox record for the most punches thrown in a round and he lived up to that No 1position here. In the first he bombarded the more experienced Flores with a whole array of punches shaking Flores time and again with shots to head and body. Flores looked as though he had aged overnight as he was blown this way and that. He tried to stand and trade but Figueroa was constantly switching guards and scoring with jabs, hooks and uppercuts from both hands. It was more of the same in the second with Figueroa on top of Flores for the whole three minutes. Flores had a bit more success than in the first and Figueroa was marked around his left eye but again he had outpunched Flores all the way. Heads clashed a couple of time in the third and Figueroa was now cut over the left eye. That made no difference to the outcome as a huge overhand left from Figueroa crashed onto the side of Flores head and sent him down heavily. He made it to his feet but Figueroa jumped on him and stunned him with a long right. A series of punches rounded off by a big right cross sent Flores down again and the referee immediately waived the fight off. It was a few minutes before Flores recovered. Figueroa is still only 22 having turned pro at 18. Last time out in September he moved up to ten rounds for the first time and stopped former interim WBA champion Oscar Escandon in the last round. He is already rated WBA 5/IBF 9(7). Flores was 25-0, 2 No Decisions until losing to Daniel Roman for the WBA super bantam title in June last year. He was knocked out by Guillermo Rigondeaux in June 2017 but the kayo punched was ruled to have been delivered after the bell to end the first round so it was a No Decision.

Rigondeaux vs. Delgado

Rigondeaux returns with a win that provides no satisfaction for anyone. His Mexican opponent was too poor to provide any sort of useful work for the Cuban star. Rigondeaux just padded after the ever retreating Delgado who never took a forward step and hardly threw a punch. Just a few seconds before the bell to end the first round Rigondeaux landed a strong straight left which then saw Delgado take a couple of steps back and go down on his knees., The referee indicated to the timekeeper that the punch had landed before the bell and that he was going to apply a count and he tolled out the ten. This is the first “fight” for 38-year-old Rigondeaux since his loss to Vasily Lomachenko in December 2017. He weighed 122 ¼ lbs so can make super bantam if that is his plan. Poor Delgado has now lost 7 of his last 8 fights but in fairness they have been against a high standard of opposition such as Diego De La Hoya, Emmanuel Rodriguez and Brandon Figueroa.

Elbiali vs. Green

Elbiali destroys oldie Green inside three rounds. The Miami-based Egyptian sent Green to the canvas in both the first and second rounds. He ended the fight in the third putting Green down again with a right and the referee waived the count.  The 28-year-old Elbiali won his first 16 fights before being stopped in six rounds by Jean Pascal in December 2017. This is his second win since then and his fifteenth win by KO/TKO. Green, 39, was looked upon as a possible world champion as he went 29-1 in his first 30 fights. He had scored wins over Carl Daniels, Carlos De Leon Jr and the 25-0-1 Tarvis Simms but then lost every round against Andre Ward in a WBA super middle title fight in 2010. He then went 3-3 in fights against good level opposition before being inactive from October 2013 until returning to the ring with one fight in 2018.

Karl vs. Watts

Sweet revenge for Texan “Cowboy” Karl as he punches too hard for previous conqueror Watts. It was an entertaining scrap while it lasted. Despite suffering a cut over his left eye Karl gradually punched the resistance out of Watts until the fifth round when with Watts shipping heavy punishment in a corner the referee halted the fight. When these two met in April last year Karl was in front on points until he was knocked down and stopped in the fifth round. Tenth win by KO/TKO for Karl. “Playboy” Watts has now lost 4 of his last 5 fights.

Delgado vs. Lopez

Mexican Olympian Delgado makes it eight from eight as he stops Lopez in the third round. Delgado was always in control in this one until a body punch sent Lopez down in the third and he was unable to beat the count. Eighth win by KO/TKO for the 24-year-old Mexican prospect. He was a top level amateur winning silver medals at both the Pan American and Central American and Caribbean Games and competing at the 2016 Olympic. He fought in the World Series of Boxing for four seasons ending with a 9-4 record. The experienced Lopez suffers his eighth loss by KO/TKO.

 

January 11

 

Shreveport, LA, USA: Light: Devin Haney (21-0) W PTS 10 Xolisani Ndongeni (25-1). Heavy: Frank Sanchez (11-0) W KO 2 Willie Jake Jr (8-2-1). Feather: Ruben Villa (15-0) W PTS 8 Ruben Cervera (10-1,1ND).

Haney vs. Ndongeni

Another scarily impressive performance from Haney as he floors and outpoints previously unbeaten Ndongeni. The South African tried to establish his jab in a speedy first round but Haney had quicker hands and feet. Ndongeni tried some long punches but Haney closed the round by raking Ndongeni with a left hook, an overhand right and a vicious straight right. Ndongeni made a fast start to the second firing jabs and overhand rights and showing some sharp movement but as he moved across the front of Haney he was nailed with a right hook that sat him on his rump. Ndongeni was up quickly and for the rest of the round he used clever footwork and upper body movement to frustrate Haney’s attempts to catch him again. In a close third Ndongeni scored with a couple of good rights and a left hook but Haney finished the round strongly with jabs and rights of his own. A low key fourth also went to Haney as he was getting his punches off first and dodging Ndongeni’s. Haney upped the pace in the fifth. He hounded Ndongeni for three minutes firing more combinations than in the earlier rounds. The pressure was forcing errors from Ndongeni and Haney made him pay for them. The sixth was closer. Again Haney did the pressing and was landing lightning quick jabs and strong rights but Ndongeni did some good work to the body. Haney had been taking the close rounds but Ndongeni had a good seventh. He was able to take Haney to the ropes and work to the body. Haney was coming up short with his jabs-apart from one that jarred loose Ndongeni’s mouthguard-and he outworked Haney to edge the round. It had been Ndongeni’s tactics to make a strong start to each round and he did that in the eighth. He rattled Haney with a couple of long rights to the chin but then Haney began to move inside cutting down Ndongeni’s space and landing short vicious shots inside. He rocked Ndongeni with a left hook and the South African began to hold for the first time in the fight. Haney ended the round with a series of right to the head with Ndongeni looking to be in trouble and tiring. Haney dominated the ninth. He stalked Ndongeni around the ring getting inside and working the body with Ndongeni relying on wild rights but always missing. After a slow start to the last Haney forced Ndongeni to the ropes and just kept firing hooks with both hands and kept Ndongeni there to the bell. Scores 100-89 twice and 99-90 for Haney. Although the highest rating Haney had before this fight was No 8 with the WBA the 20-year-old “The Dream” is on his way to a world title shot either by the end of 2019 or early in 2020. He has prodigious talent. A natural with moves you can’t teach a fighter so there are exciting times ahead for Haney. Ndongeni “The Wasp” was set an impossible task for his second fight in the USA but he showed enough to indicate he is capable of giving most rated fighters a tough night and will be in some big fights in the future.

Sanchez vs. Jake

Sanchez dismantles Jake inside two rounds. Sanchez forced the fight hard in the first with the heavier Jake not quick enough with his punches or his movement to compete as Sanchez connected with some powerful rights. There was then a delay for a problem with the ropes Sanchez then continued pressing the heavier Jakes who tried to tie-up the unbeaten Cuban on the inside. Sanchez shook himself loose and landed a crunching right to the head. Jakes backed into a corner and then under a series of punches from Sanchez he slid down the ropes and ended face down on the canvas. The referee started to count but then waived the fight off. The one big right that Sanchez did throw in that series landed on the left glove of Sanchez and it looked like Jakes was taking the easy way out. The 26-year-old 6’4” has nine wins by KO/TKO. His No Decision came when he bundled his opponent through the ropes and he was unable to continue. Sanchez was an elite level amateur. He won a silver medal at the Pan American Youth Championships and thrice won a bronze medal in the Cuban Championships. His best result was a victory over Erislandy Savon in taking a gold medal at the Cuban Giraldo Cordova Cardin tournament. He looks powerful and is one to watch. Southpaw Jakes had won his last five fights but against inferior level opposition and this is his second loss b y KO/TKO.

Villa vs. Cervera

Villa wins every round against Colombian Cervera. Villa controlled the action with his sharp, accurate right jab. He was just too quick and slick for Cervera. The Colombian connected with a good right in the first and was pressing forward for most of the fight but Villa was slotting jabs through too quickly for Cervera to block and then following with hard and accurate straight lefts.  Villa used good movement to change angles and was firing rapid combinations with Cervera often a step or two behind and swishing air with his punches. On the down side despite his total dominance even when Villa sat down on his punches he never really had Cervera in trouble. Scores 80-72 for Villa from all three judges. The 21-year-old Salinas southpaw was National Golden Gloves champion in 2014 and 2015. He scored two wins over Shakur Stevenson but lost the chance to go to the Rio Olympics when Stevenson beat him in the US Olympic Trials final. He has won 8 of his last 9 fights on points so could be short on power. Former Colombian featherweight champion Cervera was having his first fight outside of Colombia and his first fight since February 2018.

 

Santa Ynez, CA, USA: Super Welter: Maditar Ashkeyev (11-0) W PTS 10 Luis Hernandez (16-7). Middle: Meiirim Nursultanov (10-0) W KO 2 Ramon Aguinaga (13-2).

Ashkeyev vs. Hernandez

Kazak Ashkeyev outpoints Hernandez. After a shaky start when he was buzzed by a punch from Hernandez in the first Ashkeyev took over the fight and outboxed Hernandez all the way despite various infractions by Hernandez as he tried to rough up Ashkeyev. The Kazak fighter was already on his way to a wide points win when he dropped Hernandez in the last but just could not get Hernandez out of there. Scores 98-91 twice and 99-90. Ashkeyev, 30, was in his first fight scheduled for ten rounds. He is based in Oxnard, California alongside Sergey Kovalev, Oleg Usyk, Olexandr Gvozdyk and Vasyl Lomachenko. Puerto Rican Hernandez has lost 5 of his last 6 fights but all against good quality opposition.

Nursultanov vs. Aguinaga

Nursultanov, another member of the Oxnard outfit flattens Mexican Aguinaga with a brutal right. Nursultanov prowled after Aguinaga in the first looking to land his destructive right but Aguinaga made it the bell without too much danger. In the second a straight right from Nursultanov crashed onto Aguinaga’s chin. He sagged and then fell back into the ropes and bounced off ending face down on the canvas out cold. The 25-year-old Kazak now has eight wins by KO/TKO. He won a gold medal at the Asian Championships and was 13 -1in fights in the World Series of Boxing including two victories in the semi-final matches against the British Lionhearts. Aguinaga had won 8 of his last 9 fights but the loss was in his last fight in July against French hope Christian Mbilli.

 

Tacoma, WA, USA: Super Feather: Giovanni Mioletti (15-0) W TKO 3 Antonio Escalante (29-10).

Mioletti rolls on with win over experienced Escalante. After a tentative start to the first round Mioletti started to find the distance with his jab and Escalante had no real answer to it. In the second Mioletti put Escalante down with a left hook  but Escalante got up and made it to the bell. In the third a right staggered Escalante and a following left floored him again. He made it to his feet but when the eight count was finished so was Escalante who indicated he wanted out. Born in Seattle but based in Chicago Mioletti , 24,gets his sixth win by KO/TKO. He has had five fights and five wins under the banner of Brian Halquist Productions “Battle at the Boat” series at the Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma. In those five wins is a victory over unbeaten Ray Lampkin the son of the former WBA lightweight title challenger of the same name. El Paso-based Mexican Escalante was 24-2 before losing to Daniel Ponce De Leon in WBO featherweight eliminator but has fallen away and was inactive for over three years before returning with a loss in October.

 

Mar Del Plata, Argentina: Light Heavy: Walter Sequeira (22-5) W PTS 10 Facundo Galovar (10-5-1).

Sequeira continues his run of form with majority decision over Galovar. This was a war. Not much evidence of skill but entertaining for the fans. Sequeira made a slow start conceding the first round to a busier Galvan but Sequeira landed enough accurate punches to edge the second and had Galovar hurt by a right in the both the and fourth rounds. Galovar came back into the fight in the fifth and sixth as Sequeira’s work rate dropped. Sequeira had a good seventh once again shaking Galovar with a right but the eighth and ninth could have been scored either way but a left from Sequeira in the last put him in control and he emerged a clear winner. Scores 96-94 twice for Sequeira and 95-95. Now 31, Sequeira makes it five wins in his last six fights and collects the vacant WBC Latino title. His National title was not on the line. His loss in those last six fights was a fourth round stoppage against unbeaten Anthony Yarde in October. Three losses in a row now for Galovan.

 

 January 12

 

Mar del Plata, Argentina: Super Light: Jaider Parra (33-2-1,1ND) W PTS 10 Fabian Maidana (16-1).Super Light: Jonathan Eniz (23-11-1,1ND) W PTS 10 Cesar Cuenca (48-3) . Bantam: Fernando Martinez (8-0) W PTS 6 Abel Silva (5-3-3).

Maidana vs. Parra

On a mixed night for the Maidana family Marcos stages his first promotion and younger brother Fabian loses for the first time as a pro in a clash of younger brothers”. Parra, the younger brother of former WBA flyweight champion Lorenzo, proved too experienced and clever for Maidana. The visitor took a round to get into his stride but then proceeded to outbox Maidana. Parra was able to penetrate Maidana’s defence with jabs and sharp rights and was ducking under and around Maidana’s punches and took the third. Maidana managed to trap Parra on the ropes and land some hooks in the fourth but a right in the fifth opened a cut on Maidana’s left eyelid and Parra did most of the scoring in the sixth and seventh. With brother Marcos climbing into his corner Maidana finally landed some heavy punches in the eighth and rocked Parra with a left in the last but by then it was already a lost cause. Scores  98 ½-94, 98 ½-94 ½,97 ½-95 ½ all for Parra. The 36-year-old Venezuelan lost inside the distance in challenges for both the WBA super feather and interim lightweight titles and had won 10 of his last 11 fights. It would have been 11 out of 11but after he stopped Spanish prospect  20-1 Nicolas Gonzalez in January 2017 he tested positive for Clenbuterol and the result was changed to a No Decision. This win over Maidana will generate more work for Parra. Maidana, 26, had scored wins over Johan Perez and Andrey Klimov and was rated No 9 by the WBA. He was looked upon as one of the best prospects in Argentina but even though his trainer Manny Robles was flown down to be in his corner he was flat and flummoxed by the more experienced Parra.

Eniz vs. Cuenca

With Eniz only rated No 9 in the National ratings he looked a comfortable opponent for the return to the ring of former IBF lightweight champion and fellow southpaw Cuenca. This was Cuenca’s first fight since April 2016 and not surprisingly the young Eniz dominated the first two rounds. Cuenca began to find the target in the third and was expected to pick up the pace and kick on from there. That did not happen. Using a focused body attack and some vicious hooks Eniz put himself in front over the middle rounds. There were plenty of fierce exchanges with both landing heavily but although Cuenca finished strongly he was well beaten. Scores 98-94, 98-94 ½ and  97 ½-94for Eniz. The 24-year-old from Dolores was 2-2 in 2018 scoring two low level wins but being knocked out in seven rounds by unbeaten Kazak Batyrzhan Jukembayev in Montreal before performing above expectations in losing a split verdict to unbeaten Luis Veron. This win will boost his profile way up. Cuenca, 36, lost his IBF title to Eduard Troyanovsky in 2015 and was stopped in seven rounds in a return match in 2016. No talk of retirement from Cuenca.

Martinez vs. Silva

Olympian Martinez extends his 100% record to eight fights with unanimous decision over feisty Silva. This was a battle all the way. Martinez had the harder punch but Silva refused to back up and despite shipping heavy punishment banged back with some heavy punches of his own. Martinez ‘s power was decisive and he poured on the punishment as Silva tired to take the decision. Scores : 59 ½ -55 ½ , 59-56 and 59 ½ -56. Martinez, 27 represented Argentina at the World Championships and the 2016 Olympics and was a member of the Los Angeles Matadors team in the World Series of Boxing. Third loss in a row for Silva.

 

Perez, Argentina: Light; Gustavo Lemos (20-0) W TKO 4 Galvis Guerra (16-3-3).

Lemos dismantles overmatched Colombian. Lemos was piling forward connecting with hooks and overhand rights to the head. Guerra lacked the power to compete and had a leaky defence so Lemos was driving him back and rocking him with punches in close. Guerra survived a brutal third but it was all over in the fourth. A straight right from Lemos saw Guerra tottering back across the ring to the ropes where he dropped to one knee. He beat the count but suddenly without Lemos landing another heavy punch Guerra turned away from the action and again crossed the ring to the ropes and knelt down and the referee stopped the fight. Tenth win by KO/TKO for the 22-year-old “El Electrico” from Tres Arroyos and his fourth defence of his IBF Latino title. He is Argentinian No 1 and IBF have him at No 14. Second loss by KO/TKO for Guerra who is now 0-3 in fights outside of Colombia.

 

Tokyo, Japan: Super Bantam: Ryoichi Tamura (12-3-1) W PTS 10 Mugicha Nakagawa (24-6-1). Minimum: Norihito Tanaka (18-7) W TKO 8 Shin Ono (23-10-3).

Tamura vs. Nakagawa

Minor upset as Tamura wins the vacant National title at the second attempt . With 14 wins in his last 15 fights Nakagawa was the favourite but Tamura was off the mark quickly attacking strongly and scoring well to head and body. Nakagawa answered the pressure with some strong jabs and uppercuts but Tamura outscored him and at the half way mark was up 50-45, 49-46 and 48-47 on the three cards.  With his greater experience Nakagawa was expected to claw back the deficit over the second half of the fight and although he landed some sizzling rights it was Tamura who was stronger blunting Nakagawa’s attacks and emerging a comfortable winner. Scores 99-91 twice and 97-93 for Tamura. He was 3-2-1 at the start of his career but has turned things around with 9 wins in his last 10 fights with the loss being in a challenge for this title in 2017. Nakagawa, 30, had won 14 of his last 15 fights but this was only his second fight scheduled for ten rounds. To his credit he is canvassing with some success for cloud funding to help children in the Philippines

Tanaka vs. Ono

Another surprise here as Tanaka halts Ono to lift his Japanese title.  Despite Ono having the edge in height over tiny Tanaka the challenger punched his way inside negating southpaw Ono’s greater skills. He shook Ono in the second and floored him with a right in the third and after five rounds all three judges had him ahead 49-45. Ono had the better of the action in the sixth using his reach to collect the points. Tanaka was getting past the jab in the seventh and a harried Ono was deducted a point for holding. Tanaka’s attacks overwhelmed Ono in the eighth and he was battered to the floor with the referee immediately stopping the fight. Tanaka was winning a title at the third attempt. He was outpointed by future world champion Akira Yaegashi for this same title in April 2011 and was inactive from November 2011 until returning to action in February 2017. In his second shot at a title he lost to unbeaten Tsubasa Koura for the OPBF crown in April last year. Former WBA and IBF title challenger Ono was rated in the top 15 by all four sanctioning bodies so this was a severe blow to his hopes of a third world title fight.