February 27, 2014
February 27, 2014

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YOGA is not an activity immediately associated with the ‘sweet science’. But flexibility, strength and physical control are all elements that sit comfortably in a boxer’s training routines.

Matt Garcia and Kajza Ekberg have created their own ‘Boxing Yoga’ programme, designed specifically for fighters. “We spent the last couple of years researching, working with physios, working with the fighters, working with people coming in once a week to do their own workout to get fit and really studying how to complement the training,” Ekberg said. “To stretch out, to strengthen the areas that you really need, in your core and your calves, how to prevent injuries, to increase the range of movement, especially in the spine, how to be able to utilise the strength you have in your body in order to throw a punch that’s really strong.

“The main areas are working on a low-gravity stance, working on spiraling, twisting the spine, working on opening up the chest and the shoulders, relaxing the shoulders, strengthening the neck. We incorporate a lot of boxing technique.”

Boxing Yoga can be used to stretch or relax before or after a training session, or as a workout in its own right, which they do over 12 rounds of varying times. “To loosen them up, to loosen the shoulders up so they can move faster, have more body control, more awareness, they can synchronise moving with their breathing better,” Ekberg continued. “If you stretch properly, no matter what workout you do, if you stretch afterwards, you’re going to reduce the risk of soreness and being stiff, you’re going to feel better and you can get back training sooner.”

YOU CAN TRY

FOR the exercises on the facing age, ensure you’re not entirely static but breathe constantly and deepen the posture. Hold for about 30 seconds, or three-to-five deep breaths, and make a smooth and controlled transition between the postures.

1. LUNGE JAB

THE Lunge Jab is a deep stretch which lengthens the hamstrings, strengthens the quads, back and core, while increasing range of movement in the spine through a twisting motion. Aim towards a 90-degree angle on the front leg with the knee directly above the heel. Straighten the back leg and engage the thigh muscle. Maintain a tight guard and twist the spine to extend the reach forward in the punch. Keep the hips parallel and focus forward. Execute slowly.

2. REVERSE LUNGE CROSS

THE Reverse Lunge Cross works on balance, core strength and coordination. Simultaneously straighten the lead leg and bend the rear knee down towards the floor. Extend the arm forward and increase the range by twisting the spine. Aim to eventually bring the shoulders into a straight line and ensure the wrist is straight, focus forward and chin down.

3. THE OPEN LUNGE

THE Open Lunge is a flow movement which opens up the chest and increases mobility in the shoulders. Move back into an original lunge position, drop the arms down parallel to the torso, inhale and circle the arms back whilst the spine follows and chest lifts up. Stay low and grounded on the floor, exhale and draw the arms down through a guard. Make a complete, slow 360-degree circle with the arms. Repeat and deepen the execution each time.

4. THE PLANK CRUNCH

THE Plank Crunch strengthens and stabilises the whole body as well as improves kinetic chain control and balance. Keep the supporting arm and leg straight, then bend to connect the upper elbow and knee. Activate the core, rotate up onto the back toes and pivot the body parallel to the floor. Round the back, take deep breaths and balance.Balance for a couple of breaths, then lengthen the leg and place the hand and the foot down simultaneously to transition through a plank position. Repeat the exercise on the other side.

5. THE CANVAS CORE STRETCH

THE Canvas Core Stretch rounds up the routine nicely by stretching out the abs, shoulders, hip flexors and increases spinal flexibility. Place the palms directly underneath the shoulders (or the knuckles to strengthen the forearms and protect the wrists) and lift the torso up. Look up and make sure that the neck stays in alignment with the spine.

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

February 20, 2014
February 20, 2014
Tommy-Coyle

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TOMMY COYLE

Avoiding punches intelligently

ONE of his main flaws was the one that caused him to lose against Derry Mathews [l rsf 10, last July]. As a reaction, he pulls his head back and drops his hands, to try and get out of the way of a shot. He’s still not 100 per cent ironed out yet but he’s getting there. Him reacting so quickly to a shot coming is a good thing – I want the reaction speed to be the same, but I want him to react in a different way. So I try to trigger his reaction by throwing a shot at him when he’s on the pads and now he’s in the mould of pulling his hands up nice and tight. Every now and again, when he’s sparring, he’ll still do the old trick, and I’ll shout, ‘Don’t pull back, keep your hands up.’

Then he’ll go back into what he’s been doing to correct it. It’s a painstaking job and it’s frustrating for him because he’s getting to the point now where as soon as he does it he knows he’s done it. That’s the first step towards fixing it, because if he doesn’t know what he’s doing wrong, he’ll never fix it; I can only instruct it. It’s constant repetition. For something to become second nature, you’ve got to do it until you get bored with it. He’s keeping me in good shape, because I’m constantly throwing left and right hands at him, catching him and getting him to react.

Another thing was moving his head. It was like something blowing in the wind, he was moving that much. I just tried to explain to him, to get out of the way of a shot, you can just move your head six eight inches. He picks it up because he’s so enthusiastic. He’s practised at home in the mirror.

MATTHEW MACKLIN
Closing the distance and using the jab

MATT’S not going to get any better, physically or in his skill-set as a boxer, he’s a world-class fighter anyway. My job has been to make him aware of what he does well and some of the stuff he used to do well that he’s neglected recently. It’s a much different job than the one I do with Tommy, where I’m moulding him.

Matt’s got a great jab for instance and he’s neglected it recently. We’ve done a lot of padwork, a lot of technique sessions, just me and him in the ring. Then, obviously we try to replicate the kid we’re fighting with the sparring partners. We had [6ft 4ins unbeaten super-middle] Hosea Burton over in Marbella [where Macklin’s gym is situated], who was bigger and a lot more awkward than the kid Matt was actually fighting [Lamar Russ].

I like to concentrate a lot on footwork as well. You can’t get your shots off at all unless your feet are in the right position. With Lamar Russ being a lot taller and rangier, there was more emphasis on closing the distance down when getting the jab off. A lot of the emphasis on the jab was to double and triple it up because you might not land with the first one, but if you keep your momentum going forward and you target both body and head – because he might lean back but his body’s still there – you can still land. So the first jab can be a dummy jab to spark a reaction, then you follow up either upstairs or down. We did a lot of drills doing that and working on fast feet. On the pads, I’d replicate Russ. So I’d be backing off as Matt was moving in, encouraging him to cover that distance quicker, and if he was falling short with his jab he’d realise he wasn’t covering enough distance.

STEPHEN FOSTER JNR
Using his boxing skills more

I WANT him to go back to his boxing; he was a double ABA champion but he’s got such a powerful left hook, he tended to rely on that and his fitness. We need to get him going back to what he was doing years ago because he’s a lovely boxer.

I’ve had him doing lots of stuff off the back foot and I’ve really overemphasised it. He’ll never be a total counter-punching box-mover, but I thought if I took him to the other extreme – the opposite of a pressuring, come-forward fighter – he’ll land somewhere in between and that’s where he’ll be at his best.

So I’ve had him doing lots of pad drills on he back foot. I walk forward and close the distance down. I want him to use angles more. As a pressure-fighter you go in phases: you attack, then you go again, and maybe even a third phase. But I’ve been doing the opposite with Steve, getting him to go backwards in phases. So, stick a jab out, take a half-step back then, as someone comes in, hold your ground and counter them on the way in. I’ve been doing the opposite with Steve to what I’ve been doing with Macklin; I’ve been playing the pressure-fighter and trying to get him to walk me onto shots.

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

February 6, 2014
February 6, 2014

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JUST started boxing and looking to start a new eating regime to become as lean and mean as your favourite pro? This article will help you understand the basics of nutrition for boxers. A food intake is basically made up of macronutrients and micronutrients and once these are optimal, supplements can be added on top of this where required.

MACRONUTRIENTS WHAT ARE THEY?

Macronutrients are basically the ‘building blocks’ of our meals. These are classified under four brackets:

PROTEINS

  • The blocks of our muscles, essential for protein synthesis and maintaining lean muscle.
  • Contain four calories per gramme.
  • Made up of essential and non-essential amino acids.
  • Sources include: meats (chicken, turkey, beef, pork, lamb), eggs, fish, nuts, dairy products and soy products (limit use of these).

CARBOHYDRATES

  • Used to fuel training and aid recovery.
  • Contain four calories per gramme.
  • When cutting weight, use carefully and focus intake around training, reducing when away from training.
  • Sources include rice, pasta, bread, sweet potatoes, potatoes, beans, chickpeas, quinoa, couscous, and fruits.
  • Vegetables also contain carbohydrates but in a lower concentration than the above – useful for cutting weight.

FATS

  • Contain nine calories per gramme.
  • Not all fats are bad – trans fats are – but fat has a stigma attached to it that suggests we shouldn’t eat it.
  • Fat is a vital part of our diet, without it many bodily functions would not happen. Even ‘big, bad’ saturated fat is
  • required in the diet, so do not avoid this, but on the other hand, don’t go too crazy either.
  • Try to have most of your fat intake from poly-unsaturated sources e.g. olives, nuts and seeds, extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, meats, dairy.
  • Avoid man-made fats, low-fat meals and low-fat spreads. These usually contain high levels of trans fats – the bad fats..

ALCOHOL

  • Contain seven calories per gramme.
  • A pint a week or a couple of pints every two weeks isn’t going to kill anybody but as athletes you should be aware of your intake and limit this as much as possible.
  • Excessive alcohol intake can impact on recovery, muscle adaptation, appetite, blood sugar regulation and training
  • intensity the following day, so think about when to have your deserved drink so that it’s not going impact on any of the above.

MICRONUTRIENTS WHAT ARE THEY?

We then have micronutrients, which are essential for a large number of bodily functions. Think of micronutrients as the cement between your macronutrient buildings blocks, a wall can be built of the biggest bricks but easily fall down without the cement holding the bricks together, same goes for the human body. You can be “ripped” and “built” yet inside be a mess because you have neglected vitamins and minerals e.g. poor immunity, impaired recovery, tiredness, loss of concentration. Micronutrients include but are not limited to:

  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Magnesium
  • Zinc
  • Potassium
  • Sodium
  • All vitamins

Eating a varied diet including meats, dairy, vegetables, fruit, nuts, seeds and varied carb sources should cover your recommended intake of vitamins and minerals. If you are not consuming a varied diet, consult a nutritionist to see where you may be deficient.

WHAT SHOULD I EAT EACH DAY?

A good way of assessing how many macronutrients – carbohydrates, protein and fats – you need per day is to base this on your body weight. Basing these intakes on your body weight will make your intake more specific to you, as opposed to a one-size-fits-all approach. If you use the following daily intakes as a baseline and then adapt this as and when required.

BUILDING MUSCLE
(I.E. MOVING UP A WEIGHT CATEGORY)

Weight 50kgs 60kgs 70kgs 80kgs
Protein (2g/kg) 100 120 140 160
Carbs (5-6g/kg) 250-300 300-360 350-420 400-480
Fat (1-1.2 g/kg) 50-60 60-72 70-84 80-96
  • Aim for six servings of protein per day with 20-30g protein per serving.
  • Have a serving of protein before sleep to reduce muscle breakdown overnight.
  • Eat mostly low-Gi, slow-release carbohydrates to aid growth e.g. quinoa, beans, wholemeal pasta, brown/wild rice.
  • Low-Gi carbohydrates will also help lessen the amount of body fat you will gain while gaining lean muscle.
  • Focus high-Gi carbohydrates one hour before and immediately after training to fuel training and aid recovery.
  • Use healthy fats and add fats to dishes to increase the calorie intake.
  • Aim for each meal to contain at least a fist-sized serving of protein, a fist of carbohydrates, a source of fat and two
  • Fists of vegetables.

CUTTING WEIGHT
(I.E. REDUCING WEIGHT FOR A FIGHT)

Weight 50kgs 60kgs 70kgs 80kgs
Protein (2.5-3g/kg) 125-150 150-180 175-210 200-240
Carbs (2-3g/kg) 100-150 120-180 140-210 160-240
Fat (0.8 g/kg) 40 48 56 64
  • Aim for six servings of protein per day with 25-35g protein per serving.
  • Have a serving of protein before sleep to reduce muscle breakdown overnight.
  • Only eat carbs in the window around training (three hours before and one hour after) to fuel training,
  • aid training intensity, reduce injury risk and aid immunity. Reducing carbohydrate intake away from training will help increase fat metabolism.
  • Away from training, try to focus most meals around a protein source (ideally meat), a heap of vegetables (to fill up on) and a fat source.

SUPPLEMENTS

When starting out it is best to nail down the basic parts of your diet before shovelling a heap of complex and often useless supplements down your throat.

Supplements can have a place in an athlete’s diet but if the basic diet is all over the place then there is very little point in taking these supplements and wasting your money.

If you decide to take supplements then stick to a core of well-researched and safe supplements. Here are a few staple supplements that would suit a boxer’s training regime, once your diet is correct:

  • Creatine mono-hydrate.
  • Fish Oils (high EPA content).
  • Vitamin D.
  • A high-quality multi-vitamin.
  • Protein powders (e.g. whey, soy or a vegan alternative), these should not be used as a replacement for a meal but as a quick and effective recovery aid after training.

For more information, see the supplement review in the Boxing News training manual Total Fight Training.

Don’t forget to make sure these supplements are “sport safe” and have been batch-tested to reduce the risk of testing positive on doping test. The website www.informed-sport.com provides a good database of tested products suitable for athletes to use. If you have any doubts speak with a sports nutritionist, although the doping agency WADA make it clear that you are responsible for anything you put in your mouth.

  • Tom Whitehead is a nutritionist for Soulmatefood. To find out more about what Soulmatefood’s Sportskitchen can do for you go to www.soulmatefood.com.

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

January 30, 2014
January 30, 2014
Barry-McGuigan

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YOU’VE GOT TO WORK

TIMES may have changed but one thing remains constant, from Barry McGuigan’s
era to the modern age: to get to the top you need to have the right work ethic.”I worked
hard. Even after [Eusebio] Pedroza [when McGuigan won the world title], the Sunday
after the Saturday I spent 15 minutes in the sauna shadow-boxing and going through my
routines. A bit like Bernard Hopkins, I loved to train. If anything, I overtrained, I made
myself sick of it. But it worked too, I had a very high level of fitness, I could fight at a
very intense pace, which most guys couldn’t fight at,”Barry said.

His son Shane now trains Carl Frampton, another hard worker. But there are
areas where modern boxing training has evolved. Shane’s fighters work hard, but
in a different way.”I’d say strength and conditioning and nutrition would be the
main ones. With strength and conditioning, people are loading up their legs, they’re
getting their legs strong because they’re using their feet a lot more than they did,”
said Shane.”[You might] think, ‘Do your long runs, then do your padwork and your
sparring and you’ll be fine.’ The thing about long runs, it slows you down. You’re
doing a repetitive motion all the time. When you’re boxing, you’re never going
to be at one pace, you’re never going to throw the same shots all the time. It’s
fighting in bursts and being explosive.”

RUNNING ON

THERE were hints of that approach in Barry McGuigan’s training. He ran at a high
pace, saying, “I used to love to burn guys out when I was on the road and I was a
pretty decent middle-distance runner.”

Shane is scientific in the sprint sessions he lays on for his fighters, frequently
varying them. “If he’s close to the weight he’ll do more power stuff. So shorter
distances, slightly longer rest. When he’s further out he’ll do longer distances, maybe
400m with a shorter rest. But they’re all based around 400m and below. All fast
explosive pace, lots of 100s, 200s, 400s.

“You can do 100m, rest 30 seconds, 100m again, there’s loads of different
ways but as long as it’s always training that explosiveness – that’s the key.
We keep one steady-state run in there, we always do a five-miler once a week,
normally on a Saturday, once the sparring, weights and pads are all complete.
We’ll still run at a six-and-a-half-minute-mile pace.”

SPAR QUALITY

SPARRING is still paramount.”Sparring was and is the most important part of
training because it simulates the real McCoy,” said Barry. “I used to spar big guys
all the time. What Carl [Frampton]’s doing now is typical. I didn’t pull any punches
when I sparred…. I sparred hard and all my sparring partners were paid and they hit
me as hard as they could, it was the same every time in sparring. It was hard graft.
Occasionally we’d spar technically but it was hard graft because it had to simulate
the real thing and I sparred really, really good kids.”

ADAPTATION

BARRY McGUIGAN would start a typical training day with running at 8.30 or 9am
(see sidebar). “I don’t know why people run at six o’clock in the morning when you’re
fighting at 10 o’clock at night. I don’t quite understand that methodology,”
he said. “As long as you’re putting the effort in and you’re making your heart
work really hard when you’re doing your interval stuff, that’s what it’s about.”

Shane has gone one step further. His fighters have their boxing session in the
morning and then in the evening either do weight-training, if they’ve been
sparring, or running. “We do our boxing training first, that’s the most important
session of the day. That’s where they want to be fresh. All the strength and
conditioning and the running and the sprints, they’re not going to be sprinters,
they’re not going to be weightlifters, it’s all for their boxing. First up we make sure
we put all our time and effort into the boxing and that’s normally
about 11am,” Shane explained.

“I do a lot of technical work on the pads. That’s where people learn,
it’s the most realistic movements. We do heaps and heaps and heaps of
pads. Carl today he did 11 rounds on the pads with me and then he did one round
on the bag to finish off with and then he did three rounds of shadow-boxing.

“A lot of padwork is technique stuff. Get your conditioning from hitting the
bag, get your conditioning from doing the pads and your high-intensity skipping
and stuff like that. We’ll start sparring with Carl and then after that he’ll
warm up, he’ll get taped up, he’ll spar. We always spar first, we won’t do our pads
first. Then if he spars eight rounds, we’ll finish off with four on the pads, or if he spars six rounds
we’ll do maybe four on the pads and two on the bags but we’ll always make up the 12
rounds, even when we’re far out in camp, just because it helps get the weight down.”

Where the boxer is at in his training camp or sparring will inform his evening
workout.

“It’s all periodised; when they’re further out we do more circuitbased stuff and then
when he starts doing his heavy sparring, [the weight-training] becomes more strengthbased,
the reps get lower and then the last couple of phases we go a bit more into
power. There’s always like a deload week, a week, 10 days before the fight,
because you need to atrophy the guys [decrease their muscle mass] because they
want to get into that weight category, be as light as they can but as big as they can
for their weight category. There is definitely a science to it and 10-12 weeks out
it’s all planned before they come into camp,” Shane explained.

Barry echoed his son’s view on the need for a scientific approach to modern
boxing training, particularly hen it comes to nutrition for weight-making.”Strength
and conditioning is becoming a major focus on training. Steady-state running, most
fighters are still doing it because it’s easy,he noted but added, “making weight is still
the biggest issue.”

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

January 30, 2014
January 30, 2014

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YOU’VE GOT TO WORK

TIMES may have changed but one thing remains constant, from Barry McGuigan’s era to the modern age: to get to the top youneed to have the right work ethic.”I worked hard. Even after [Eusebio] Pedroza [when McGuigan won the world title], the Sunday after the Saturday I spent 15 minutes in the sauna shadow-boxing and going through my routines. A bit like Bernard Hopkins, I loved to train. If anything, I overtrained, I made myself sick of it. But it worked too, I had a very high level of fitness, I could fight at a very intense pace, which most guys couldn’t fight at,” Barry said.

His son Shane now trains Carl Frampton,another hard worker. But there are areas where modern boxing training has evolved. Shane’s fighters work hard, but in a different way. “I’d say strength and conditioning and nutrition would be the main ones. With strength and conditioning, people are loading up their legs, they’re getting their legs strong because they’re using their feet a lot more than they did,” said Shane. “[You might] think, ‘Do your long runs, then do your padwork and your sparring and you’ll be fine.’ The thing about long runs, it slows you down. You’re doing a repetitive motion all the time. When you’re boxing, you’re never going to be at one pace, you’re never going to throw the same shots all the time. It’s fighting in bursts and being explosive.”

RUNNING ON

THERE were hints of that approach in Barry McGuigan’s training. He ran at a high pace, saying, “I used to love to burn guys out when I was on the road and I was a pretty decent middle-distance runner.”

Shane is scientific in the sprint sessions he lays on for his fighters, frequently varying them.”If he’s close to the weight he’ll do more power stuff. So shorter distances, slightly longer rest. When he’s further out he’ll do longer distances, maybe 400m with a shorter rest. But they’re all based around 400m and below. All fast explosive pace, lots of 100s, 200s, 400s.

“You can do 100m, rest 30 seconds,100m again, there’s loads of different ways but as long as it’s always training that explosiveness – that’s the key. We keep one steady-state run in there, we always do a five-miler once a week, normally on a Saturday, once the sparring, weights and pads are all complete. We’ll still run at a six-and-a-half-minute-mile pace.”

SPAR QUALITY

SPARRING is still paramount.”Sparring was and is the most important part of training because it simulates the real McCoy,” said Barry. “I used to spar big guys all the time. What Carl [Frampton]’s doing now is typical. I didn’t pull any punches when I sparred… I sparred hard and all my sparring partners were paid and they hit me as hard as they could, it was the same every time in sparring. It was hard graft. Occasionally we’d spar technically but it was hard graft because it had to simulate the real thing and I sparred really, really good kids.”

ADAPTATION

BARRY McGUIGAN would start a typical training day with running at 8.30 or 9am (see sidebar).”I don’t know why people run at six o’clock in the morning when you’re fighting at 10 o’clock at night. I don’t quite understand that methodology,” he said. “As long as you’re putting the effort in and you’re making your heart work really hard when you’re doing yourinterval stuff, that’s what it’s about.”

Shane has gone one step further. His fighters have their boxing session in the morning and then in the evening either do weight-training, if they’ve been sparring, or running. “We do our boxing training first, that’s the most important session of the day. That’s where they want to be fresh. All the strength and conditioning and the running and the sprints, they’re not going to be sprinters, they’re not going to be weightlifters, it’s all for their boxing. First up we make sure we put all our time and effort into the boxing and that’s normally about 11am,” Shane explained.

“I do a lot of technical work on the pads. That’s where people learn, it’s the most realistic movements. We do heaps and heaps and heaps of pads. Carl today he did 11 rounds on the pads with me and then he did one round on the bag to finish off with and then he did three  rounds of shadow-boxing.

“A lot of padwork is technique stuff. Get your conditioning from hitting the bag, get your conditioning from doing the pads and your high-intensity skipping and stuff like that. We’ll start sparring with Carl and then after that he’ll warm up, he’ll get taped up, he’ll spar. We always spar first, we won’t do our pads first. Then if he spars eight rounds, we’ll finish off with four on the pads, or if he spars six rounds we’ll do maybe four on the pads and two on the bags but we’ll always make up the 12 rounds, even when we’re far out in camp, just because it helps get the weight down.”

Where the boxer is at in his training camp or sparring will inform his evening workout.

“It’s all periodised; when they’re further out we do more circuitbased stuff and then when he starts doing his heavy sparring, [the weight-training] becomes more strengthbased, the reps get lower and then the last couple of phases we go a bit more into power. There’s always like a deload week, a week, 10 days before the fight, because you need to atrophy the guys [decrease their muscle mass] because they want to get into that weight category, be as light as they can but as big as they can for their weight category. There is definitely a science to it and 10-12 weeks out it’s all planned before they come into camp,”Shane explained.

Barry echoed his son’s view on the need for a scientific approach to modern boxing training, particularly when it comes to nutrition for weight-making.”Strength and conditioning is becoming a major focus on training. Steady-state running, most fighters are still doing it because it’s easy,”he noted but added, making weight is still the biggest issue.”

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

January 23, 2014
January 23, 2014

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A PERFORMANCE training hoodie from LUTA, lightweight but comfortable. Billed as water resistant, windproof and breathable, it’s great for training outdoors but light and thin enough for working in the gym.

It has a pocket with a concealed zip for an MP3 players, and zips to widen the sleeves at the wrist so they can go over gloves.

The hood fits snugly over your forehead, to prevent it obscuring vision when jogging or shadowboxing. Luta donates half of its profits to sports and education projects for young people.

RRP £64.99
www.luta.co.uk

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*

January 16, 2014
January 16, 2014

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THE rotating push-up grips allow the user to target a wider variety of muscles than the standard press-up, crucially without placing additional strain on the joints.

The instability discs challenge your core stability and improve the stabilising muscles.

The elevation racks allow the user to perform a much deeper and thus more intense press-up.

This is a portable product that will add variety to your workout.

RRP £34.95
www.blitzsport.com

*For training information and workouts from some of the biggest names in combat sport don’t miss the Fighting Fit: Train like the Stars special*