September 25, 2014
September 25, 2014
Floyd Mayweather Jr. v Marcos Maidana - News Conference

LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 10: WBC/WBA welterweight champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. attends a news conference at the MGM Grand Hotel/Casino on September 10, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Mayweather Jr. will defend his titles against Marcos Maidana on September 13 in Las Vegas. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) ** OUTS - ELSENT, FPG - OUTS * NM, PH, VA if sourced by CT, LA or MoD **

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MANNY PACQUIAO is sick and tired of Floyd Mayweather following the unbeaten star’s latest admissions.

The American was hauled before the Nevada State Athletic Commission this week to explain why he was seen on Showtime’s ‘All Access’ shows encouraging fighters in his gym to ‘fight to the death’ in brutal sparring sessions – one of which appeared to include an astonishing 31-minute round.

Floyd’s explanation to the cruelty is a good one. It was all false. It was acted and edited out to entertain television audiences, and more importantly, attract more buys for his PPV rematch with Marcos Maidana on September 13. It seems plausible and is, on the surface, the perfect excuse. Should the Nevada commission decide to investigate further however, and one imagines it won’t be difficult to find the original unedited footage, they will discover exactly what happened. But don’t bet on it.

For many years Mayweather has been a cash cow for Las Vegas. He’s been allowed to do as he pleases for a long time. It is probable that the 31-minute round – in which one fighter appeared to take a horrible beating – was manufactured. Perhaps the cannabis being smoked by Floyd’s hangers on in the same show was also, as Floyd insists, fake.

Ultimately the blurring of the lines between fact and fiction needs to stop for the sake of the sport he undeniably rules. Granted, Reality TV is as far away from reality as Floyd is, but his circus needs some order.

While out in America for his most recent fight, British journalists asked when he was last made to fight a mandatory contender? Goodness knows. We gave up going back through his record when we reached 2005. And then there’s the tiresome Pacquiao saga. The Filipino has again been pushing for a fight with Mayweather recently, and immediately following the superstar’s victory over Maidana it seemed plausible – again – when Floyd indicated he wanted in on that action, too. Predictably, though, his interest soon cooled when the cameras were off.

Both fighters should be ashamed for not making this fight happen years ago, but it has appeared like the ball has been in Mayweather’s court for a while.

“Floyd Mayweather’s testimony to the commission on All Access’ authenticity tells me everything I need to know about his desire to fight me,” said Pacquiao on Twitter.

Mayweather’s talents should never be denied, and he has worked exceptionally hard to reach his current status, but that shouldn’t mean he can talk his way out of anything he pleases.