August 21, 2015
August 21, 2015
Barker 3

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HAVING outlined the technique behind both the jab and the cross, I now move on to the hook.

The lead hook to the head
This can be effectively employed when your opponent throws their backhand
1. Start in your basic stance. Keep your free hand (my right) up, covering your chin. A lot of fighters drop their free hand when throwing the hook.
2. Lean your hips, left shoulder and left knee to the left.
3. Punch through the target and then bring your lead hand straight back to your chin.
4. Throw at the same time as your opponent. Don’t extend your arm too wide. Bring your elbow up and turn into the shot off the front foot.

The back-hand hook to the head
This should only be thrown from short range
1. Start in your basic stance. Keep your free hand (my left) up, covering your chin.
2. Lean your hips, right shoulder and right knee to the right.
3. Don’t extend your arm too wide. Bring your elbow up and turn into the shot off the front foot. This will look straighter than the lead hook.
4. Punch through the target and then bring your rear hand straight back to your chin.

The lead hook to the body
You must first establish optimum range, as this can leave you open
1. Start in your basic stance. Ideally you will have thrown a jab previously, to establish the range.
2. Take a small step forward and to the left. Lean your hips, left shoulder and both knees down and to the left.
3. The shape of your arm should be more rounded than when throwing to the head, as you are whipping the shot around your opponent’s elbows.
4. Punch through the target and then bring your lead hand back to your chin.

Next time, we look at the technique behind the uppercut.