Category Archives: Technique

January 16, 2018
January 16, 2018
Feedspot followFeedly follow

Video: Matchroom Boxing

January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018
left hook to the body

Action Images

Feedspot followFeedly follow

I used to love throwing the left hook to the body and I used to stop a lot of my opponents with this shot, but every now and then I would spar with someone who had this counter locked down.

The two fighters who come to mind are Jamie Moore and Matthew Macklin. Ironically enough, these boys fought each other and had one of the best fights in British boxing history.

When I threw that hook to the body, these boys were so fast to catch it and counter both ways – countering with the left or right.

When someone does this it really makes you think twice about throwing the shot. I learned a lot by sparring with these boys who were both British and European champions in their careers.

On this video I give you two options of countering body shots and I’m going to be doing more educational stuff like this so please subscribe to my YouTube channel and follow our educational page on Instagram @BoxNBurnAcademy and if you want to learn how to teach boxing take our online certification course at www.boxnburnacademy.com

Here is the video link:

November 30, 2017
November 30, 2017
Feedspot followFeedly follow

Video: BoxNation

November 21, 2017
November 21, 2017
Feedspot followFeedly follow

Video: Golden Boy Promotions

November 20, 2017
November 20, 2017
Floyd Mayweather

Esther Lin/Showtime

Feedspot followFeedly follow

November 14, 2017
November 14, 2017
teaching boxing

Mikey Williams/Top Rank

Feedspot followFeedly follow

10 TIPS for boxing teaching boxing for fitness

The boxing fitness industry can be great for boxers who are retiring.

Ten years ago, a boxer who was hanging up the gloves didn’t have much to fall back onto, but now with boxing for fitness being one of the biggest workout trends in the world, if they are smart they can earn a good living by teaching boxing to others as they have more boxing experience than 99% of personal trainers.

I have been doing it successfully for seven years now and even though I was a very successful boxer, I would say I’m even more successful at this. However, it’s something I have had to work on; it’s not as straightforward as you may think.

Here are some tips for boxers teaching boxing fitness.

  1. Realize you’re teaching boxing for fitness reasons and not for a fight – good form is important but not crucial. If you work a full session on perfecting the jab, it’s going to be pretty boring, and if your client gets bored, the workout becomes a chore, and if it becomes a chore, they won’t last long.
  2. Have fun and be positive with clients; don’t be too serious like your coach may have been with you. When teaching beginners how to box, it WILL feel awkward, so tell them they are about to feel awkward.

When I say ‘have fun’, this doesn’t mean tell them your little sister can punch harder than them, but do give them new combos and have them rolling punches – be creative with your workout and let your personality show.

  1. Promote yourself as a ‘former competitive boxer’ and if you have won anything in your sports career, use that, ie ‘former national champion boxer’. This is what sets you apart from other trainers.
  2. Do plenty of pad work. Clients love – and I mean love – hitting the pads, so learn how to hold them correctly. You should know what it feels like – too much resistance could hurt them, but too little and they can jar their elbow.
  3. Realise that just because you were a boxer, and it doesn’t matter what level you achieved, it doesn’t mean you’re going to be a good boxing fitness trainer. This takes time.

There are some boxing fitness trainers out there, like Box ’N Burn’s Stephen Cain who was a former footballer. He had never had a pair of gloves in his life when he started with us, but now I would say he is a better boxing fitness trainer than 95% of boxers who come into this industry.

This is because he practices, studies and really understands the fundamentals now. I’ve seen some former high-level boxers try to teach boxing to people and they have been terrible.

6.Don’t stop learning! It wasn’t until I started to teach boxing that I understood the true fundamentals of the sport. We can never stop learning, and that includes  technique, strength and conditioning, speed and agility and resistance training to name just a few.

On top of that, learn about social media and marketing and how to sell. You can be the best trainer in the world but without social media and marketing and a way to sell, you’re not going to be making much or get any clients.

  1. Always wrap your clients hands and make sure you wrap correctly. If they get injured, they can’t train and probably won’t want to train with you again. On top of this, they feel like a badass boxer as soon as you wrap.
  2. Leave your ego at the door. As boxers, we all have egos. You will see other trainers teaching clients that may not be doing it correct. Rather than laugh, criticise and think to yourself how you would be able to give that client a better workout, you should approach them when they’re not with the client and talk with them to help them.

teaching boxing

You should just be a good person too. You never know how they could help you down the line with something like how to sell personal training, or how to perfect some TRX work. In this industry, build as many great relationships with people as you can as it really does go a long way.

  1. Be honest. If a client tells you they’ve had surgery on their back and need to strengthen it up, they’ll ask if you know how. They could also say they want to build muscle to get bigger and ask how they could do this. If you don’t know, tell them the truth and pass them on to a trainer who can help them properly. The trainer will appreciate that, and chances are they will do the same if they ever have a client that wants to learn boxing.
  2. Invest in your self, buy nice equipment, mitts, gloves for your clients that smell nice, go and do certification courses, seminars, and conferences Now I’m going to do a shameless plug! Take the Box ’N Burn Certification course. This is where you learn how to teach boxing, We have taught over 20,000 people how to box here in LA over the last five years, and have taught over 1,000 trainers how to teach boxing, including lots of former boxers, current fighters, and professional boxing trainers. We give our methods and provide secrets on how to teach someone how to box if they have never boxed before.

Our method is very successful and our online course is now available. Use the coupon code TONYBLOG before December 15th and you will save $100

Learn more here: https://boxnburnacademy.com/

November 10, 2017
November 10, 2017
boxer

Action Images

Feedspot followFeedly follow

I was 22 years old and had just qualified for the Olympics when I was sitting in a cafe and received a phone call from Olympic champion Audley Harrison. I couldn’t believe it! He gave me some advice that changed my whole boxing career and helped me capture a medal in the 2008 Games in Beijing. He told me about visualization.

As a young buck from Sunderland who worked on a burger van on weekends outside the Stadium of Light football ground, I had no idea what this fella who I had looked up to for years was telling me.

Then he explained how it worked and it was pretty amazing.

What I did was lie in bed the night before a fight and visualize everything about the fight in fine detail. It included the car ride to the venue, walking to the dressing room with my coach, putting on my music to warm up, looking sharp and strong, walking to the ring with the crowd screaming, staring at my opponent, the ref bringing us together, touching gloves and going through the fight, landing the jab, not getting hit, moving great, feeling great and then at the end of the fight getting my hand raised.

The reasoning behind this because once the fight comes around I’ve already done it mentally; I know whats going to happen and how it goes. This helps a lot when it comes to the fight.

boxer

It’s hard to lie in bed doing this. I used to feel nervous, get sweaty palms, and my heart would race. I actually used to get nervous about doing this, but after I did I would feel amazing. Audley told me this was something he did during the 2000 Sydney Olympics and insisted it helped him capture that heavyweight gold medal.

I can’t recommend this highly enough to any boxer out there.

After retiring from boxing I now teach people how to teach boxing with the Box ‘N Burn Academy.