Category Archives: Blog

September 21, 2017
September 21, 2017
Luke Campbell

Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos/Golden Boy Promotions

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MY friend, Olympic champion Luke Campbell, is training for the biggest fight of his life right now as he prepares to face Jorge Linares for the WBA world title next weekend (Saturday September 23), writes Tony Jeffries (whose Box ‘N Life podcast can be found HERE).

The fight is not far from where I live here in LA. Luke was originally training in Florida, but because of the hurricanes over there he dropped me a line on Instagram and said he was coming to LA and wanted to train at my Box ‘N Burn gym.

So, he has been, and I’ve been watching him train – he looks phenomenal! His hand speed, footwork and strength are great. He told me that his whole camp has been amazing and he is more than ready.

Linares is the most experienced person he has fought as a pro as he has had 45 fights, boxing 268 rounds with a 60% KO ratio.

I think Luke brings something to the table that he has never seen, though. Luke’s footwork, southpaw style, accuracy and boxing brain are world class, as well as his mindset. You don’t achieve what Luke has without real heart and determination.

Luke Campbell

Speaking with Luke this week, talking about life as a pro, he really has his head screwed on with the professional game and has his finances under control which is refreshing!

I did a podcast on 8 Things Olympians should do after the games HERE IT IS and he really has ticked all the boxes – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/33-8-things-olympians-should-do-after-the-games/id924241760?i=1000374499219&mt=2

He has it takes to beat this guy and I’m backing our Olympic hero to win by a late stoppage.

September 20, 2017
September 20, 2017
Canelo Alvarez

Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos/Golden Boy

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Something has to change with the boxing scoring system. We see fighters and the public complaining about the scores far too often, writes Tony Jeffries (whose Box ‘N Life podcast is available HERE). This weekend’s huge fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin was another example of this. Ninety-nine percent of people thought GGG easily won; I personally thought he had done enough to get the decision, but didn’t think it was as easy as everyone was saying.

One judge, Adalaide Byrd, had GGG only winning two of the 12 rounds while another judge had him on top in seven and winning the fight. Now, how can these scores be so far apart?

I get it if it’s only one or two rounds, but this is ridiculous!

I think when this happens, the judge should be sat down and made to watch the fight back from the angle they were watching it with other officials and then explain their reasoning for the scoring.

If all the officials disagree with them, then they should not be allowed to judge again. This should prevent people thinking that palms are being greased.

Judges and the public need to be on the same page on how to judge a fight; we can’t have one judge that judges fighters on defence and counterpunching, while another judge scores on the opposite. They, along with the public, need to be on the same page.

The reason I loved the old amateur scoring system was that it was simple – you hit them and you get a point, they hit you and they get a point.

I would love to see this in the pros where the person who hits the other person more in the round with a clean blow wins the round. They should have that score on the TV screen at all times!

Maybe this is the way, maybe it’s not. Either way, something needs to change. Chances are it will never change, there’s too much politics and too many dinosaurs in boxing

Check out my podcast, where I talk about boxing, fitness and business HERE:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-n-life-podcast-life-in-out-of-the-gym/id924241760?mt=2

September 20, 2017
September 20, 2017
Floyd Mayweather

Esther Lin/Showtime

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Consider the curse of the Pugilist Specialist.

The curse of the Pugilist Specialist (hereafter referred to as PS) being the ability to win fights, at the highest level, without taking unnecessary risks, and therefore in the eyes of many without providing sufficient entertainment.

It came to mind at the weekend when I was watching Billy Joe Saunders make easy work of Willie Monroe Jr. The talk on Twitter and elsewhere was that the challenger should have done a lot more and that, equally, Saunders, against a lack-lustre opponent should have won in more emphatic fashion.

Now I understand all of that, and I also understand that boxing is the entertainment business and that winning the crowd as well as the fight is the ultimate goal.

But it’s also the hurt business and the cash business. Boxing’s dangerous and precarious, one slip, one lapse of concentration and a fighter can suffer injury and defeat; health can be ruined, as well as future financial prospects. It’s only ever one swing of a glove away so if you’re a PS, one of the few who can hit and not get hit, who can win comprehensively on points and live to fight another day, then you’d be mad not to wouldn’t you?

Saunders can, so he does. So does Rigondeaux, so did Mayweather.

Most fans will never love those kinds of fighters as much they’ll always love the likes of Gatti and Ward, for example, and I have no problem with that. It’s inspiring when you see people push themselves to the limit and achieve things they’d never dared to dream of through pure determination to succeed, and it’s easy to identify with their limitations when they come up short, and to take pride in the courageous manner of their defeat. And that doesn’t just apply to boxing it applies to anything.

It’s generally less easy to love competitors who don’t seem to have to dig that deep, who don’t need to give as much of themselves, for whom a life and death struggle is just not their modus operandi. Those kinds of boxers will have fewer fans, their fights will get fewer views on YouTube, but they’ll always have a lot of admirers within their own profession, amongst their fellow pugilists they’ll always be the subject of great envy. Why? Because they’d all fight like that if they could. They might not all admit to that on the record, but privately they’ll all tell you the same thing, which is that of all the things boxers miss about the sport when they hang up the gloves, the one thing that none of them miss is getting hit.

But if you don’t get hit then we don’t see you get hurt, we don’t see you bleed and if we don’t see that then how do we know you really have what it takes, how do we know you’re a true warrior and someone genuinely worthy of our admiration? We’re suspicious of fighters who like to avoid being hit, we almost seem to disapprove of those who view being punched in the head as something that should be avoided rather than embraced.

I think that kind of unconscious disapproval is why, when a PS wins comfortably and unspectacularly when we were expecting or hoping for high drama, we tend to criticise the PS’ opponent for not doing more rather than praise the PS for not allowing him to.

For years people kept saying that Mayweather’s opponents had to put him under pressure and rough him up to beat him but nobody ever managed to do it. Marcos Maidana had a modicum of success with that strategy in their first fight and it provoked a hysterically disproportionate response. The Argentinian came nowhere near to winning the fight but people seemed to feel vindicated somehow, as if the fact that the PS had had his rhythm disturbed for a couple of rounds before adapting and conquering proved that he wasn’t that good after all. It was insane.

Floyd Mayweather

I can’t wait for Rigondeaux vs Lomachenko because what we have there, I believe, is a new kind of match-up, maybe the first of its kind. A pure PS in Rigo vs a crowd-pleasing PS in Loma. The notion of a crowd-pleasing PS is one that blows my mind because it contradicts almost everything I’ve written here but the Ukrainian is one. He proved his minerals by insisting on taking on an over-the-weight Salido in just his second fight and yet his PS credentials are there for all to see. I expect Lomachenko to win because he’ll be too big for his fellow double Olympic gold medallist, who has been the same weight since he was 17. But I expect it to be a significant night for Rigondeaux on December 9 nonetheless because I believe it could be the night when this superb fighter, booed by crowds and shunned by TV, will be embraced like he has never been before and receive the wider recognition he’s been long overdue. I believe that because I think he will lose and I think he will bleed and that, if you’re ever going to be accepted and admired, is what has to happen.

September 18, 2017
September 18, 2017
Canelo Alvarez

Tom Hogan/Hogan Photos/Golden Boy

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1. Rematch
Such a tremendous fight, featuring a thunderous display from Gennady Golovkin and bursts of fantastic quality from Canelo Alvarez, deserves a rematch.

Factor in the shocking card that had Canelo winning for one judge and leaving the fight to result in a controversial draw, a rematch surely simply must happen.

Canelo Alvarez

2. Canelo Alvarez vs Miguel Cotto

For the first time Canelo actually fought at the middleweight limit, 160lbs and while he performed excellently in a thrilling fight, he couldn’t come away with victory and frankly appeared to lose the fight. If Golovkin-Canelo were going to collide again perhaps later next year, in the meantime there is another highly appealing rematch that could see Alvarez hone his skills further, taking on Miguel Cotto once again before the Puerto Rican great retires.

Watch their first fight here:

Video: HBO Boxing

3. Gennady Golovkin vs Billy Joe Saunders

The draw was highly frustrating for Golovkin but he still retains the WBA, IBF and WBA middleweight world titles. The only belt outside of his clutches is the WBO crown that Billy Joe Saunders defended against Willie Monroe Jr in London on Saturday. Taking on Saunders would allow Golokin to unify the division.

4. Canelo Alvarez vs David Lemieux

If a rematch with Golovkin cannot be arranged next, Alvarez has proven he is one of the best middleweights in the world (and probably one of the best fighters in the world at any weight). He should stay in the middleweight division and taking on big punching David Lemieux would surely produce another thriller.

5. Gennady Golovkin vs Danny Jacobs

Outside of Canelo Alvarez, Danny Jacobs gave Gennady Golovkin his toughest fight. Jacobs believes he has the tools to defeat the great Kazakh and this rematch would settle that question.

Watch their fight here:

Video: HBO Boxing

September 17, 2017
September 17, 2017
Canelo Alvarez - Gennady Golovkin

Joe Camporeale/USA Today Sports

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WHILE it fleetingly conjured up memories of great fights gone by, Canelo-Golovkin will ultimately be remembered alongside the most infamous decisions in history. As many predicted, the eagerly awaited showdown was marred by a controversial outcome on the cards as the 12-round contest was declared the most horrible draw since Lennox Lewis was cheated out of victory over Evander Holyfield in 1999.

A thoroughly outrageous score of 118-110 in Canelo’s favour handed in by Adelaide Byrd immediately took the shine off what had been a wonderful contest, albeit one that appeared to have been won by Golovkin. The Kazakh did get a 115-113 nod, before a tally of 114-114 confirmed the draw.

Not since Marvin Hagler lost his world title to Sugar Ray Leonard in 1987 has there been such controversy in a middleweight championship bout. Perhaps repeated viewings of this contest will be kind to Canelo like they have been to Leonard (who was also on the right end of a highly contentious 118-110 score back then), but for now – here at the T-Mobile Arena –the smell is unbearable. A draw, if three close cards had been returned would have been sufferable, but Byrd’s tally is simply outrageous.

The bout started slowly but by the fourth, Golovkin seemed to be in control as his jab began to dictate. A superb fifth session saw both exchange before the WBA, WBC and IBF champion upped his output during the middle rounds. By the 10th – another wild session – Golovkin appeared to be cruising to victory.

Canelo changed his approach as the minutes ticked down, his habit of waiting on the ropes and inviting punishment was replaced by initiating his own attacks. The Mexican certainly finished strongly, but the result seemed a formality at the final bell.

When Michael Buffer read out the 118-110 score nobody in the arena was surprised. But then when Canelo’s name quickly followed boos almost took the roof off. Canelo, the fan favourite throughout the build-up and the early rounds, suddenly became public enemy number one. Indeed, at this juncture, only a rematch could possibly lead to forgiveness.

But don’t blame Canelo. Blame this rotten stinking sport. And while you’re at it, blame Adelaide Byrd. Serious questions must be asked about how she only scored two rounds to Golovkin. It’s possible she was swayed by the crowd who initially cheered Canelo’s every swing, but such adoration was not present in each of the 10 rounds she scored for the Mexican. Whatever her reasoning, we must be allowed to hear it.

Boxing was relying on this fight tonight and as a contest, it was thrilling, no question. But any new fans the action created would surely have been repulsed by what followed. How could you possibly explain that score to someone who had never seen boxing before tonight?

You can’t. Of course you can’t.

September 17, 2017
September 17, 2017
Canelo Alvarez vs Gennady Golovkin

Al Bello/Getty Images

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IT’S hard understate the anticipation ahead of Canelo Alvarez vs Gennady Golovkin.

Two of the finest fighters on the planet, both heavy handed, both aggressive in temperament finally collide to decide middleweight supremacy and near enough the peaks of their respective careers. This is what boxing is all about and Boxing News has been there every step of the way.

The ultimate big fight guide is in this week’s issue of the magazine (still available to download HERE) and scroll down for our live ringside blog.

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September 16, 2017
September 16, 2017
Billy Joe Saunders vs Willie Monroe Jr

Action Images/Matthew Childs

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LATER all eyes will turn to Las Vegas as Gennady Golovkin and Canelo Alvarez battle to decide the finest fighter on the planet (you will be able to follow our live ringside blog in America later HERE). But the missing piece of the middleweight puzzle, the WBO 160lbs world title, will be on the line in the Billy Joe Saunders vs Willie Monroe Jr fight at the Copperbox in Stratford.

The winner in London will expect to take on the Golovkin-Canelo victor in a middleweight unification contest so the stakes are high, and the build up has been fractious.

Scroll for all the latest updates from Billy Joe Saunders vs Willie Monroe Jr.

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